Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events”: The Miserable Mill (Review)

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Imagine a boot, covering up the tattoo of an eye, forever.

Even though this series foretells a gloomy and unsatisfying ending to this show (and they’re kind of right), it’s amazing how Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events wraps up Season 1 with a return to form, highlighting all that was good about the pilot while also addressing some of the complaints I raised before. How considerate of them to forecast a fat twenty-something blogger’s objections regarding a kids’ TV Show, I suppose. I’ll keep up the “parents are still alive WTF?” rant from the first review post I made, but let’s be clear and vague both: I underestimated this series, and I was wrong in my previous appraisal concerning that subplot.

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Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events”: The Wide Window (Review)

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Neil Patrick Harris as Count Olaf playing Jim Carrey as Sean Connery

It’s another day, another unfortunate episode in the life of the Baudelaires… only this time (sooner than expected), the formula’s breaking up a bit. There’s a subtle, but crucial difference between the book and Netflix endings for The Wide Window. The show, at least in the first two episodes, portrays the orphans as more proactive and uncompromising (though they should probably learn to keep their mouths shut when talking to Count Olaf). I’m interested in where the plot goes next season, because it’s in that point in the books where the Baudelaires break away from the adults’ cycle of stupidity. Wide Window (the book) ends with a “here we go again” sense of pace; I don’t imagine the next episode will be like that.

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Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events”: The Reptile Room (Review)

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I struggled with the decision to watch this series on Fridays, instead of a binge-watch. But I think Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events planned for breaks in its design. The show, at the beginning of The Reptile Room, takes time to remind the audience about the characters, situations, and general plot surrounding the Baudelaire orphans (I think that was the first time I got “Baudelaire” spelled right on the first try!). Such a recap hinders adults with the license to watch the series all at once, but this program’s a misery-for-all-the-family show, and it’s still a darn good one.

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Netflix’s “A Series of Unfortunate Events”: The Bad Beginning (Review)

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My blog might convince some people that I spent my youth as a Potterhead, or as a Star Wars Expanded Universe junkie. My first literary serial love was always A Series of Unfortunate Events: darling, dearest, dreadfully mishandled by the 2004 movie. Maybe I wasn’t ready for Daniel Handler’s unique humor to be on screen, but I remember, as a kid, for the first time during a film, a sense of betrayal. Well, now Netflix has brought the books to life, with the original author as a producer and a schedule that will give each of the 13 ASOUE books plenty of breathing room. How’d the first two episodes (based on The Bad Beginning) turn out? Great! … except for a subplot that kind of misses the point of the books and might end up tainting the whole production. I’ll get into that.

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